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Virtuous in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a Virtuous calligraphy wall scroll here!

Personalize your custom “Virtuous” project by clicking the button next to your favorite “Virtuous” title below...


  1. Wise and Virtuous

  2. Moral and Virtuous

  3. Forgive and Forget

  4. Industrious / Hard Working

  5. Helpfulness

  6. Changing Oneself / Self Reformation

  7. Never Forget Your First Resolution

  8. Life in Balance / Balancing Life

  9. Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country

10. The Foundation of Good Conduct

11. Goodness / Good Deed

12. Goodness / Kind-Hearted

13. Healthy Living

14. Live Together and Help Each Other

15. Life of Love

16. Love and Honor

17. Love and Respect

18. Principles of Life

19. Achieve Inner Peace; Find Deep Understanding

20. Life with Love

21. Mutual Welfare and Benefit

22. Life Full of Love

23. Life of Love

24. Even The 100-Foot Bamboo Can Grow One More Foot

25. Freedom from Anger and Worry Yields Longevity

26. You must endure a harsh winter to appreciate the warmth of springtime

27. Impartial and Fair to the Brotherhood and Sisterhood of the World

28. Life in Harmony / Balanced Life

29. Love and Honor

30. Love and Respect

31. Spiritual Strength / Strength of Spirit

32. Confucius: Golden Rule / Ethic of Reciprocity

33. Heaven Blesses the Diligent

34. Inner Peace

35. True Victory is Victory Over Oneself

36. Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial

37. Drinking the water of a well: One should never forget who dug it

38. A Life of Serenity Yields Understanding

39. Triple Truth of Japanese Buddhism

40. Better to be Happy than Rich

41. Keep Your Feet on the Ground

42. Never Give Up

43. Inner Strength is Better than Outward Appearance

44. Having High Principles

45. A Life of Happiness and Prosperity

46. Live for What You Love

47. Patience Yields Peace of Mind

48. Inner Strength is Better than Outward Appearance

49. Live In The Moment / Live In The Now

50. Live For The Day

51. Work Unselfishly for the Common Good

52. One Justice Can Overpower 100 Evils

53. Always Striving for Inner Strength

54. The Five Tenets of Confucius

55. A Life of Happiness and Prosperity

56. Live Without Regret

57. Carpe Diem / Seize the Day

58. Live For The Day / Seize The Day

59. Forgive and Forget

60. Strong-Minded Woman

61. Good Heart

62. Ardent / Fierce

63. White Dragon

64. Extreme Faithfulness

65. Good Intentions / Good Will / Good Faith

66. Diligence


Wise and Virtuous

xián
ken
Wise and Virtuous Scroll

賢 is used to refer to being a wise, trustworthy and virtuous person. But it also contains the ideas of intelligence, genius, scholarship, virtue, sage, saint, good, excellent in character.

賢 is used in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. Also used in a Buddhist context with same meaning.

Note: Can also be male given name, Masaru, in Japanese.

Moral and Virtuous

toku
Moral and Virtuous Scroll

德 is the simple way to express the ideas of having virtue, morals, kindness, benevolence, goodness etc.

德 also happens to be the first character of the Chinese word for Germany.


徳There is a slight deviation in the Japanese Kanji form. If you want the modern Japanese version, please click on the special Kanji shown to the right instead of the button above. Note that the traditional Chinese form is still readable and understood by Japanese people.


See Also:  Ethics | Chastity | Prudence | Benevolence | Morality

Forgive and Forget

Confucian Proverb
bú niàn jiù è
Forgive and Forget Scroll

This Chinese proverb can be translated as, "Do not recall old grievances", or more simply as, "Forgive and forget".

The character breakdown:
不 (bù) not; no; don't.
念 (niàn) read aloud.
舊 (jiù) old; former.
惡 (è) wicked deeds; grievances; sins.

This proverb comes from the Analects of Confucius.

Forgive and Forget

Water Under the Bridge
mizu ni naga su
Forgive and Forget Scroll

水に流す is a Japanese proverb which suggests that "water continues to flow".

It's similar to our English phrase, "Water under the bridge". The perceived meaning is, "Forgive and forget".

I have also seen this translated as, "Don't cry over spilled milk".


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Industrious / Hard Working

ài gǎng jìng yè
Industrious / Hard Working Scroll

Used to refer to someone who puts forth maximum effort and achieves much.

We might call this kind of person a "go-getter" in English.


See Also:  Dedication | Tenacious | Devotion

Helpfulness

lè yú zhù rén
Helpfulness Scroll

Helpfulness is being of service to others, doing thoughtful things that make a difference in their lives.

Offer your help without waiting to be asked. Ask for help when you need it. When we help each other, we get more done. We make our lives easier.


See Also:  Caring | Charity | Benevolence

Changing Oneself / Self Reformation

ji ko kai kaku
Changing Oneself / Self Reformation Scroll

This Japanese title refers to one who changes themselves or improves themselves by reforming their lives.

Another way to translate it is, "A person who changes their attitude or something about themselves".

Never Forget Your First Resolution

Never Lose Your Beginner's Spirit
sho shin wasu ru be ka ra zu
Never Forget Your First Resolution Scroll

This is an old Japanese proverb that suggests you try to never forget the enthusiasm you had as a child when you try new things (or even face the day-to-day). Basically avoid having a mundane attitude that many people get with age.

You'll find this Japanese proverb translated a few different ways. Here are some of them:
Don't forget your first resolution.
Never forget your child-like enthusiasm.
Forget not the beginner's mind.
Try never to lose your initial enthusiasm (freshness of attitude).


Note: This is sometimes written as 初心忘る可からず. The one shown above is used about 10x more often. There’s only one character difference between the two versions.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Life in Balance / Balancing Life

The art of balancing your life
píng héng rén shēng
hei kou jin sei
Life in Balance / Balancing Life Scroll

This title suggests that you are actively trying to keep your life in balance. Think of this as being the action-verb of seeking or having a balanced life.

The first two characters mean balance, equilibrium or keeping things equal.

The last two characters mean "life". Literally "human life".

Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country

The most famous tattoo in Chinese history
jìn zhōng bào guó
Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country Scroll

This proverb is the tattoo worn on the back of Yue Fei, a famous Chinese warrior who lived until 1142 A.D.

The tattoo can be translated as "Serve the country with the utmost loyalty". More literally, it means, "[The] Ultimate Loyalty [is too] Duty [of] Country".

Legend has it that this tattoo once saved his life when he was accused of treason.

The first two characters have come to create a word that means "serve the country faithfully" or "die for the country". Note: It's more a willingness to die for one's country than the actual act of dying.

The last two characters have come to mean, "Dedicate oneself to the service of one's country".

Both of these words are probably only in the Chinese lexicon because of this famous tattoo.

If you break it down, character-by-character, here is what you get:
1. To the utmost, to the limit of something, the ultimate.
2. Loyalty or duty (a sense of duty to one's master, lord, country, job).
3. Report, recompense, give back to (in this case, you are giving yourself to your country as payback).
4. Country, state, nation, kingdom.


More about the famous warrior and army general, Yue Fei

The Foundation of Good Conduct

Quote from Confucius
zhì yú dào jù yú dé yī yú rén yóu yú yì
The Foundation of Good Conduct Scroll

This proverb from the Analects of Confucius translates as:

Resolve yourself in the Dao/Tao/Way.
Rely on Virtue.
Reside in benevolence.
Revel in the arts.

According to Confucius, these are the tenets of good and proper conduct.


This was written over 2500 years ago. The composition is in ancient Chinese grammar and phrasing. A modern Chinese person would need a background in Chinese literature to understand this without the aid of a reference.

Goodness / Good Deed

shàn
zen
Goodness / Good Deed Scroll

善 means goodness, virtue, good deed, charitable, benevolent, well-disposed, nice, pleasant, kind, or simply, "good".

善 is the kind of good that applies to someone's good character, or a good person in general.

Referring to someone with this word means that they have a well-aimed moral compass, are charitable, giving, wise, and honest. Basically, this is a blanket statement for every good trait a human can have, or all the things that make someone good.

In another context, it can mean to improve or perfect something or refer to someone who is good at something.

Goodness / Kind-Hearted

shàn liáng
zen ryou
Goodness / Kind-Hearted Scroll

善良 means good and honest, kind-hearted, goodness, excellence, and/or virtue.

Healthy Living

jiàn kāng shēng huó
kenkou seikatsu
Healthy Living Scroll

If you are into healthy living, this might be an excellent selection for a wall scroll to hang in your home.

The first two characters speak of health, vitality, vigor, and being of sound body. The second two characters mean living or life (daily existence).


See Also:  Strength | Vitality | Health

Live Together and Help Each Other

kyou son kyou ei
Live Together and Help Each Other Scroll

This Japanese proverb means, "live together and help each other", "existing together, thriving together", or "co-existence and co-prosperity".

Life of Love

ài qíng shēng huó
aijyou seikatsu
Life of Love Scroll

愛情生活 is the Chinese proverb for "Loving Life". Some also translate this as "[your] Loving Life" or "Life full of Love".

愛情生活 is about being a loving person (to spouse and/or family) during your life. 愛情生活 is not the same as loving the state of being alive - not "love of living" but rather "being loving person during your life".


Note: Korean pronunciation is included above, though use of this proverb in Korean has not been verified.

This proverb can be understood in Japanese but it’s primarily a Chinese proverb (it will "feel" Chinese to a Japanese person).

Love and Honor

ai to homa re
Love and Honor Scroll

愛と譽れ means to love and honor in Japanese.

The first Kanji is literally "love".
The second character just acts to connect the ideas like "and" or "with".
The last two Kanji mean "honor" or "honour". 愛と譽れ is the kind of honor that suggests you are praising or admiring someone.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Love and Honor

Love and Respect

Love each other and show mutual respect
xiāng ài hù jìng
Love and Respect Scroll

相愛互敬 is a nice way to say "Love and Respect" in Chinese.

This proverb is about the mutual exchange of love and respect within a good relationship.

The first two characters create a word that means, "to love each other" or "mutual love".

The third character means mutual, interlocking, or in some contexts "to dovetail" (as in the way joints are made in fine furniture).

The last character means, "to respect", "to venerate", "to salute", "reverence", or simply "respect".

Principles of Life

shēng huó xìn tiáo
Principles of Life Scroll

This Chinese proverb means "principles of life" or "The personal obligations and rules that you live by".

For instance, if you were a vegetarian, the act of not eating meat fits into this category.
This could also be translated as "Way of living".

Achieve Inner Peace; Find Deep Understanding

níng jìng ér zhì yuǎn
Achieve Inner Peace; Find Deep Understanding Scroll

寧靜而致遠 is five characters from a longer ten-character proverb composed by Zhuge Liang about 1800 years ago.

Zhuge Liang

诸葛亮 Zhuge Liang

The proverb means, "Your inner peace / tranquility / serenity will help you see or reach far (into the world)".

The last word means "far" but the deeper meaning is that you will surpass what you can currently see or understand. Perhaps even the idea of opening up vast knowledge and understanding of complex ideas.

Life with Love

ai no a ru jin sei
Life with Love Scroll

This Japanese phrase means "Life with Love".


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Mutual Welfare and Benefit

Jita-Kyoei
ji ta kyou ei
Mutual Welfare and Benefit Scroll

自他共榮 can be translated a few different ways. Here are some possibilities:
Benefit mutually and prosper together.
Mutual welfare and benefit.
A learning concept of mutual benefit and welfare (that applies to all fields of society).
Mutual prosperity.

The first two characters are easy to explain. They are "self" and "others". Together, these two characters create a word which means "mutual" (literally "me and them").

The third character can have different meanings depending on context. Here, it means "in common" or "to share".

The fourth character suggests the idea of "prosperity", "flourishing" or becoming "glorious".

It should be noted that these Kanji are used almost exclusively in the context of Judo martial arts. 自他共榮 is not a common or recognized Japanese proverb outside of Judo.


In modern Japanese Kanji, the last character looks like 栄 instead of 榮. If you want this slightly-simplified version, please let us know when you place your order.

Life Full of Love

ai ni afu re ta jin sei
Life Full of Love Scroll

This Japanese proverb means "life full of love" or "life filled with love".


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Life of Love

aini michita seikatsu
Life of Love Scroll

This Japanese phrase means "a loving life" or "life filled with love".


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Even The 100-Foot Bamboo Can Grow One More Foot

bǎi chǐ gān tóu gèng jìng yī bù
Even The 100-Foot Bamboo Can Grow One More Foot Scroll

This proverb literally translates as: [Even a] one-hundred foot [tall] bamboo [can] progress even one [more] step.

Figuratively, this means: After having achieved a fair degree of success, one should try to do still better.

Freedom from Anger and Worry Yields Longevity

bù qì bù chóu huó dào bái tóu
Freedom from Anger and Worry Yields Longevity Scroll

This Chinese proverb means, "Without anger or worry, you will have a long life, until after all your hair is white".

It more literally reads, "Don't get angry or worried [and you will] live [long] till [all your] hair [becomes] white".

You must endure a harsh winter to appreciate the warmth of springtime

You must know hardship to appreciate happiness
bù jīng dōng hán bù zhī chūn nuǎn
You must endure a harsh winter to appreciate the warmth of springtime Scroll

This literally translates as: Without having experienced the cold of winter, one cannot appreciate the warmth of spring.

Figuratively, this means: One cannot truly appreciate happiness without having gone through hardship.

There are many contrasts in life. One simply cannot fully know what joy is without having experienced misery, difficulty, and pain. How could you explain "light" if you did not have "darkness" to compare it to?

Embrace hardship, as it makes the good times seem even better.

Impartial and Fair to the Brotherhood and Sisterhood of the World

yí shì tóng rén
isshidoujin
Impartial and Fair to the Brotherhood and Sisterhood of the World Scroll

一視同仁 is how to write "universal benevolence". 一視同仁 is also how to express the idea that you see all people the same.

If you are kind and charitable to all people, this is the best way to state that virtue. It is the essence of being impartial to all mankind, regardless of social standing, background, race, sex, etc. You do not judge others but rather you see them eye to eye on the same level with you.


See Also:  Benevolence | Compassion | Equality | Justice | Right Decision | Selflessness | Work Unselfishly for the Common

Life in Harmony / Balanced Life

Harmonious Life
hé xié shēng huó
Life in Harmony / Balanced Life Scroll

This title suggests that you have, or want to get your life in balance.

The first two characters regard the idea of balance, harmony, and peace.

The second two characters mean "life". More specifically this refers to your livelihood, career, and the daily activities that comprise your life or living. Some would translate those two characters as "one's daily existence".


Note: We have a couple of titles for this idea. This version is more of a noun, thus "The Balanced Life" verses a verb form like "Balancing [Your] Life."

Life in Harmony / Balanced Life

cho wa sei katsu
Life in Harmony / Balanced Life Scroll

This Japanese title suggests that you have, or want to get your life in balance.

The first two Kanji mean harmonious or in harmony.

The second two Kanji mean "life". More specifically this refers to your livelihood, career, and the daily activities that comprise your life or living.

Love and Honor

shēn qíng hòu yì
Love and Honor Scroll

深情厚義 means to love and honor. 深情厚義 is more or less the kind of thing you'd find in marriage vows.

The first two characters suggest deep love or deep emotions, passion, and feelings.
The last two characters mean generous justice or thick honor (the third character is an adjective that means generous or thick). It just means that you will honor your lover's wishes, and treat them justly and righteously (fairly).


This is the longer four-character version, there is also a short and sweet two character version.


See Also:  Love and Honor

Love and Respect

Love and respect each other
xiāng jìng xiāng ài
Love and Respect Scroll

相敬相愛 is an old Chinese proverb that suggests love and respect go together and are to be exchanged between people (especially couples).

The first two characters mean, "exchanging respect" or "mutual respect".

The last two characters create a word that means, "to love each other" or "mutual love".

You'll notice that the first and third characters are the same. So you can read this literally as something like "Exchange respect, exchange love" or "Mutual respect, mutual love". In English, we'd probably just say, "Mutual love and respect". Grammar differs in every language - So while the literal translation might sound a bit awkward in English, this phrase is very natural in Chinese.

Spiritual Strength / Strength of Spirit

jīng shén lì liàng
seishin rikiryou
Spiritual Strength / Strength of Spirit Scroll

This title speaks of one's soul or spirit, and the capacity or strength that soul possesses.

The first two characters mean mind, heart, spirit, and/or soul.

The last two characters mean strength, capacity, or ability.

Note: Separately, these are two words in Japanese, and can be pronounced but this does not make a natural title in Japanese (best if your audience is Chinese).

Confucius: Golden Rule / Ethic of Reciprocity

Do not do to others what you do not want done to yourself
jǐ suǒ bú yù wù shī yú rén
Confucius: Golden Rule / Ethic of Reciprocity Scroll

Some may think of this as a "Christian trait" but actually it transcends many religions.

This Chinese teaching dates back to about 2,500 years ago in China. Confucius had always taught the belief in being benevolent (ren) but this idea was hard to grasp for some of his students, as benevolence could be kind-heartedness, or an essence of humanity itself.

When answering Zhong Gong's question as to what "ren" actually meant, Confucius said:

"When you go out, you should behave as if you were in the presence of a distinguished guest, when people do favors for you, act as if a great sacrifice was made for you. Whatever you wouldn't like done to you, do not do that thing to others. Don't complain at work or at home".

Hearing this, Zhong Gong said humbly, "Although I am not clever, I will do what you say".

From this encounter, the Chinese version of the "Golden Rule" or "Ethic of Reciprocity" came to be.
The characters you see above express, "Do not do to others whatever you do not want done to yourself".


See Also:  Confucius Teachings | Benevolence

Heaven Blesses the Diligent

tiān dào chóu qín
Heaven Blesses the Diligent Scroll

This can be interpreted a few different ways:
God blesses those who work hard.
It is the way of Heaven to smile on the diligent.
God will reward those that are worthy.
Heaven blesses those who are diligent.

Whichever translation you like, a scroll like this on your wall may serve as a reminder to work hard because your diligence will pay off both in this life and the next.


Note: This can be pronounced in Korean, but it's not a commonly used term.

Inner Peace

nèi xīn píng jìng
naishin heizyou
Inner Peace Scroll

This Chinese and Japanese phrase is a direct translation for the western idea of inner peace.

The first two characters contain the idea of "heart", "innermost being", or "deep in the/your inner mind".

The last two characters mean "tranquil" and "serene".

I have seen this phrase used as "inner peace" for art prints and even on the side of coffee cups. But I think the translation is too literal. It feels like a direct translation from English rather than a nicely composed Chinese or Japanese phrase. See my other entries for "inner peace".


See Also:  Serenity | Simplicity | Peace

True Victory is Victory Over Oneself

masa katsu a gatsu
True Victory is Victory Over Oneself Scroll

This proverb is often translated as, "True victory is victory over oneself".

However, literally, Kanji by Kanji, it means, "True victory [is] my/self victory".

My Japanese friends rate this very highly for a wall scroll.


See Also:  Know Thy Enemy Know Thyself

Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial

dà gōng wú sī
Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial Scroll

This Chinese proverb comes from an old story from some time before 476 BC. About a man named Qi Huangyang, who was commissioned by the king to select the best person for a certain job in the Imperial Court.

Qi Huangyang selected his enemy for the job. The king was very confused by the selection but Qi Huangyang explained that he was asked to find the best person for the job, not necessarily someone that he personally liked or had a friendship with.

Later, Confucius commented on how unselfish and impartial Qi Huangyang was by saying "Da Gong Wu Si" which if you look it up in a Chinese dictionary, is generally translated as "Unselfish" or "Just and Fair".

If you translate each character, you'd have something like,

"Big/Deep Justice Without Self".

Direct translations like this leave out a lot of what the Chinese characters really say. Use your imagination, and suddenly you realize that "without self" means "without thinking about yourself in the decision" - together, these two words mean "unselfish". The first two characters serve to really drive the point home that we are talking about a concept that is similar to "blind justice".

One of my Chinese-English dictionaries translates this simply as "just and fair". So that is the short and simple version.

Note: This can be pronounced in Korean but it's not a commonly used term.


See Also:  Selflessness | Work Unselfishly for the Common Good | Altruism

Drinking the water of a well: One should never forget who dug it

chī shuǐ bú wàng jué jǐng rén
Drinking the water of a well: One should never forget who dug it Scroll

This proverb suggests that one should always be grateful to those who helped you succeed.

And remember your ancestors and those that came before you whose sacrifices made your present life better.

Some Chinese will separate the intended meaning from this proverb and translate this as "Don't forget the people who once helped you". In Modern China, this idiom is virtually never used to refer to an actual well.

Note: This can be pronounced in Korean but it's not a commonly used phrase.

A Life of Serenity Yields Understanding

dàn bó yǐ míng zhì, níng jìng ér zhì yuǎn
A Life of Serenity Yields Understanding Scroll

This is a kind of complex ten-character proverb composed by Zhuge Liang about 1800 years ago.

This Chinese proverb means "Leading a simple life will yield a clear mind, and having inner peace will help you see far (into the world)".

What I have translated as "simple life" means NOT being materialistic and NOT competing in the rat race.

The last word means "far" but the deeper meaning is that you will surpass what you can currently see or understand. Perhaps even the idea of opening up vast knowledge and understanding of complex ideas.

The whole phrase has a theme that suggests if you are NOT an aggressive cut-throat person who fights his way to the top no matter how many people he crushes on the way, and instead seek inner peace, you will have a happier existence and be more likely to understand the meaning of life.


See Also:  Serenity

Triple Truth of Japanese Buddhism

ningensei o saisei suruno wa kanyou na kokoro shinsetsu na kotoba houshi to omoi yari no seishin
Triple Truth of Japanese Buddhism Scroll

人間性を再生するのは寛容な心親切な言葉奉仕と思いやりの精神 is the Triple Truth of Buddhism in Japanese.

The Buddha ordered that all should know this triple truth...
A generous heart, kind speech, and a life of service and compassion are the things which renew humanity.

人間性を再生するのは寛容な心親切な言葉奉仕と思いやりの精神 is the English translation most commonly used for this Japanese Buddhist phrase. You might have seen this on a coffee cup or tee-shirt.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Better to be Happy than Rich

ān pín lè dào
Better to be Happy than Rich Scroll

安貧樂道 means "It's better to be happy than rich" in Chinese.

Even if you are poor, you should still feel satisfied in your life...

...Satisfaction, happiness, and the meaning of your life come from within yourself and not from money or riches of the world.

In Chinese, there are a lot of four-character proverbs which express some very old philosophies.
Though there are only four characters on this scroll, in Chinese the meanings often surpass the dictionary definition of each character.

In this case, you should not set your expectations too high for the amount to money or riches you wish to have. One who sets their expectations too high is almost always disappointed. Instead, you should cherish what you have, and seek to improve yourself from within, and not measure your personal worth by the size of your bank account.


See Also:  A Sly Rabbit Will Have Three Openings to Its Den

Keep Your Feet on the Ground

Be Down-to-Earth
jiǎo tà shí dì
Keep Your Feet on the Ground Scroll

This four-character proverb suggests that you should be practical, realistic, and grounded.

Some translate this as a suggestion to be down-to-earth.

The first character means "feet".
The second means "step on" or "stand".
The third means "solid", "real", or "true".
The last character means "ground", "earth", or "terra".

Literally this means, "[keep your] Feet Standing [on] Solid Ground".

Never Give Up

yǒng bù fàng qì
Never Give Up Scroll

The first character means "eternal" or "forever", the second means "not" (together they mean "never"). The last two characters mean "give up" or "abandon". Altogether, you can translate this proverb as "never give up" or "never abandon".

Depending on how you want to read this, it is also a statement that you will never abandon your hopes, dreams, family or friends.


See Also:  Undaunted | No Fear | Hope

Inner Strength is Better than Outward Appearance

biǎo zhuàng bù rú lǐ zhuàng
Inner Strength is Better than Outward Appearance Scroll

表壯不如里壯 literally translates as: [Better to be] strong inside than [to be] strong outside.

The ancient original meaning was:
[An] able [husband] outside [working to support a family is] not as good as [an] able [wife] inside [working and saving to take care of the family].

The current meaning is:
Inner strength is more important than outward appearance.

Having High Principles

Do not bow down for the sake of five pecks of rice
bù wèi wǔ dǒu mǐ zhé yāo
Having High Principles Scroll

This Chinese idiom/proverb speaks of being above bribes, and not losing face or honor for a short-term gain.

Some may also translate the perceived meaning as, "high-hearted", or "integrity beyond reproach".

The more literal meaning is "Do not bow down for the sake of five pecks of rice".

A Life of Happiness and Prosperity

xìng fú chéng gōng de yì shēng
A Life of Happiness and Prosperity Scroll

This means, "A life of happiness and prosperity" or "A life of happiness and success".

It's a great and very positive and inspirational wall scroll selection.


See Also:  Prosperity

Live for What You Love

jin sei ou ka
Live for What You Love Scroll

人生謳歌 means, "live for what you love" in Japanese.

The first two characters mean "human life" or simply "living". The last two characters mean, "merit", "prosperity", or "what you enjoy". This phrase can suggest working or staying busy for your own goals (in your career).


See Also:  Prosperity

Patience Yields Peace of Mind

néng rěn zì ān
Patience Yields Peace of Mind Scroll

This ancient Chinese proverb can be translated as, "Patience brings peace of mind", "One who has patience, finds peace", and a few other ways.

Inner Strength is Better than Outward Appearance

naimen no tsuyosa ha gaiken no yosa ni masaru
Inner Strength is Better than Outward Appearance Scroll

This Japanese proverb literally translates as "inner/internal strength/power [versus] outward-appearance [the] merit/virtue/good quality [does] excel/surpass/exceed/outweigh".

More naturally in English, this would be "Inner Strength Outweighs Outward Appearance".


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Live In The Moment / Live In The Now

xiàn shì
gen sei
Live In The Moment / Live In The Now Scroll

現世 is a very short way to write "live in the moment" or "live in the now" in Japanese.

This short word is open to interpretation. It's used in Japanese Buddhism to mean "the current epoch" or "the current age" (the current age is but a brief moment in the greater scope of existence). When used in that context, this is pronounced "utsushiyo" or "ustusiyo" in Japanese. Otherwise, it's pronounced "gensei" in Japanese.

Other translation possibilities include:

Live for now
Earthly world
This world
This life
Earthly life
Present life
Present generation
Present incarnation
Current age
This existence
This (momentary) reality


Note: This is also a word in Chinese and old Korean Hanja. While the meaning is more or less the same, this is not recommended for a wall scroll if your audience is Chinese or Korean. This selection is best if your audience is Japanese.

Live For The Day

huó zài jīn tiān
Live For The Day Scroll

活在今天 is not really an eastern concept, so it does not translate into a phrase that seems natural on a wall scroll.

However, if this is your philosophy, the characters shown here do capture your idea of living for today or living in the moment. 活在今天 literally say "Live in today" and they are grammatically correct in Chinese.


Note: This kind of makes sense in Korean Hanja but the grammar is Chinese, so it’s not that natural in Korean.

Work Unselfishly for the Common Good

kè jǐ fèng gōng
Work Unselfishly for the Common Good Scroll

This can also mean: "Place Strict Standards on Oneself in Public Service".
This Chinese proverb is often used to express how one should act as a government official. Most of us wish our public officials would hold themselves to higher standards. I wish I could send this scroll, along with the meaning to every member of Congress, and the President (or if I was from the UK, all the members of Parliament, and the PM)

The story behind this ancient Chinese idiom:
A man named Cai Zun was born in China a little over 2000 years ago. In 24 AD, he joined an uprising led by Liu Xiu who later became the emperor of the Eastern Han Dynasty.

Later, the new emperor put Cai Zun in charge of the military court. Cai Zun exercised his power in strict accordance with military law, regardless of the offender's rank or background. He even ordered the execution of one of the emperor's close servants after the servant committed a serious crime.

Cai Zun led a simple life but put great demands on himself to do all things in an honorable way. The emperor rewarded him for his honest character and honorable nature by promoting him to the rank of General and granting him the title of Marquis.

Whenever Cai Zun would receive an award, he would give credit to his men and share the reward with them.
Cai Zun was always praised by historians who found many examples of his selfless acts that served the public interest.
Sometime, long ago in history, people began to refer to Cai Zun as "ke ji feng gong".


See Also:  Unselfish | Selflessness | Altruism

One Justice Can Overpower 100 Evils

yī zhèng yā bǎi xié
One Justice Can Overpower 100 Evils Scroll

This ancient "One Justice Can Overpower a Hundred Evils" idiom and proverb is famous in China. But it has been around so long that its origins have long been forgotten.

It could be something that Confucius or one of his disciples said but no one can say for sure.

Always Striving for Inner Strength

zì qiáng bú xī
Always Striving for Inner Strength Scroll

This proverb or idiom suggests that the pursuit self-improvement is eternal. It can also be a suggestion to strive unremittingly in life.

The first two characters mean inner-strength with the idea of self-improvement. The last two characters mean "never rest" or "striving without giving up".

Some will translate these four characters as, "Exert and strive hard without any let up".

The Five Tenets of Confucius

The Five Cardinal Rules / Virtues of Confucius
rén yì lǐ zhì xìn
jin gi rei tomo nobu
The Five Tenets of Confucius Scroll

仁義禮智信 are the core of Confucius philosophy.

Simply stated:
仁 = Benevolence / Charity
義 = Justice / Rectitude
禮 = Courtesy / Politeness / Tact
智 = Wisdom / Knowledge
信 = Fidelity / Trust / Sincerity

Many of these concepts can be found in various religious teachings. Though it should be clearly understood that Confucianism is not a religion but should instead be considered a moral code for a proper and civilized society.

This title is also labeled, "5 Confucian virtues".


礼 If you order this from the Japanese calligrapher, expect the middle Kanji to be written in a more simple form (as seen to the right). This can also be romanized as "jin gi rei satoshi shin" in Japanese. Not all Japanese will recognize this as Confucian tenets but they will know all the meanings of the characters.


See Also:  Confucius Teachings | Ethics

A Life of Happiness and Prosperity

kou fuku to ha nei no jin sei
A Life of Happiness and Prosperity Scroll

This Japanese proverb means, "A life of happiness and prosperity" or "A life of happiness and success".


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Prosperity

Live Without Regret

shēng ér wú huǐ
Live Without Regret Scroll

生而無悔 is how to say "live without regrets" in Mandarin Chinese.


Note: There is some debate about whether this makes sense in Japanese. It would be read, "nama ji mu ke," and be understood in Japanese. But, a Japanese person will probably think it’s Chinese (not Japanese).


See Also:  Live for Today

Live Without Regret

jinsei kui nashi
Live Without Regret Scroll

This is how to say "live without regrets" in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Live for Today

Carpe Diem / Seize the Day

bǎ wò jīn rì
Carpe Diem / Seize the Day Scroll

把握今日 is the closest and most natural way to express this proverb in Chinese.

The first two characters mean "to seize" but can also be translated as "take control of".

The last two characters mean "today".

Live For The Day / Seize The Day

ima wo i ki ru
Live For The Day / Seize The Day Scroll

今を生きる is a Japanese phrase that can be translated as "live for the day", "live for the moment", "seize the day", or "make the most of the present".

You can think of this as the Japanese version of "Carpe Diem".


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Forgive and Forget

lüè jì yuán qíng
Forgive and Forget Scroll

This Chinese proverb means, "to overlook past faults", or "forgive and forget".

It's more literally, "Abridge or make small the scars from your past emotions". Basically, you should let it go.

The character breakdown:
略 (lüè) abbreviation; omission; abridge.
跡 (jī) ruins; scar; traces.
原 (yuán) former.
情 (qíng) feeling; emotion.

Strong-Minded Woman

reppu
Strong-Minded Woman Scroll

烈婦 is a Japanese title for a strong-minded woman, virtuous woman, or heroine.

In some context, it can refer to a pure or chaste woman.

Good Heart

A heart of kindness, benevolence, and virtuous intentions
shàn xīn
yoshinaka
Good Heart Scroll

This literally reads, "Good Heart" but is used to refer to the ideas of kindness, benevolence, philanthropy, virtuous intentions, moral sense, and conscience.

Some will also translate this as morality of mind (as the character for heart is often used to mean mind).

In Japanese, this can be the given name Yoshinaka.

Ardent / Fierce

liè
retsu
Ardent / Fierce Scroll

This Chinese word means ardent; intense; fierce; stern; upright; to give one's life for a noble cause.

In another context, this character can refer to one's exploits or achievements.

In Buddhist context, this is burning, fierce, virtuous and/or heroic.

While technically, it had the same meaning in Japanese, it's usually a female given name, Retsu in Japanese these days.

White Dragon

bái lóng
White Dragon Scroll

白龍 is a sophisticated or scholarly way to say, "White Dragon". 白龍 is the title you'd expect in ancient Chinese literature.

The first character means white, pure, or bright.

The second character means dragon.

The White Dragon represents a king who is virtuous and pure.

Extreme Faithfulness

tei retsu
Extreme Faithfulness Scroll

貞烈 is the Japanese Kanji for, "Extreme Faithfulness".

The first Kanji means "firm adherence to one's principles", chastity (of a woman), chaste, etc.

The second Kanji means ardent, intense, fierce, stern, upright, to give one's life for a noble cause, exploits, achievements, virtuous, and in some contexts, heroic.

Now you get the idea why this refers to someone who is extremely faithful (to a cause, themselves, their religious beliefs, or their philosophy.

Good Intentions / Good Will / Good Faith

shàn yì
zen i
Good Intentions / Good Will / Good Faith Scroll

善意 is a word that means good intentions, good will, or to things done in good faith in Chinese, Japanese, and old Korean Hanja.

It's sort of the reason you do good deeds, or the desire you have inside yourself to do the right thing.

This can also be translated as benevolence, kindness, virtuous mind, positive mindset, or favorable sense.

善意 is also used in legal context for things that are done in good faith (regardless of outcome).

In Japanese, this can be the personal name Yoshi or Yoshii.

Diligence

qín
kin
Diligence Scroll

This single-character means diligence or "sense of duty" in Chinese and Korean (also understood in Japanese but not commonly-seen as a stand-alone Kanji).

As a single character on a wall scroll, this will only be seen with this meaning. However, it can also mean industrious, hardworking, frequent, regular, constant, energy, zeal, fortitude, or virility.

In Buddhism this can represent vīrya (viriya), the idea of energy, diligence, enthusiasm, or effort. It can be defined as an attitude of gladly engaging in wholesome activities, and it functions to cause one to accomplish wholesome or virtuous actions. Some Buddhists may even define this as "manliness" (a definition from a hundred years ago, before equality).

If you, or someone you know is a hard-worker (or needs a reminder to be diligent), then this is the wall scroll to have in your/their office.


See Also:  Tenacity | Undaunted


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji (Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Wise and Virtuous
kenxián / xian2 / xianhsien
Moral and Virtuous
tokudé / de2 / dete
Forgive and Forget不念舊惡
不念旧恶
bú niàn jiù è
bu2 nian4 jiu4 e4
bu nian jiu e
bunianjiue
pu nien chiu o
punienchiuo
Forgive and Forget水に流すmizu ni naga su
mizuninagasu
Industrious
Hard Working
愛崗敬業
爱岗敬业
ài gǎng jìng yè
ai4 gang3 jing4 ye4
ai gang jing ye
aigangjingye
ai kang ching yeh
aikangchingyeh
Helpfulness樂於助人
乐于助人
lè yú zhù rén
le4 yu2 zhu4 ren2
le yu zhu ren
leyuzhuren
le yü chu jen
leyüchujen
Changing Oneself
Self Reformation
自己改革ji ko kai kaku
jikokaikaku
Never Forget Your First Resolution初心忘るべからず / 初心忘る可からず
初心忘るべからず
sho shin wasu ru be ka ra zu
shoshinwasurubekarazu
Life in Balance
Balancing Life
平衡人生hei kou jin sei
heikoujinsei
hei ko jin sei
heikojinsei
píng héng rén shēng
ping2 heng2 ren2 sheng1
ping heng ren sheng
pinghengrensheng
p`ing heng jen sheng
pinghengjensheng
ping heng jen sheng
Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country盡忠報國
尽忠报国
jìn zhōng bào guó
jin4 zhong1 bao4 guo2
jin zhong bao guo
jinzhongbaoguo
chin chung pao kuo
chinchungpaokuo
The Foundation of Good Conduct誌于道據于德依于仁遊于藝
志于道据于德依于仁游于艺
zhì yú dào jù yú dé yī yú rén yóu yú yì
zhi4 yu2 dao4 ju4 yu2 de2 yi1 yu2 ren2 you2 yu2 yi4
zhi yu dao ju yu de yi yu ren you yu yi
chih yü tao chü yü te i yü jen yu yü i
Goodness
Good Deed
zenshàn / shan4 / shan
Goodness
Kind-Hearted
善良zen ryou / zenryou / zen ryo / zenryoshàn liáng
shan4 liang2
shan liang
shanliang
Healthy Living健康生活kenkou seikatsu
kenkouseikatsu
kenko seikatsu
kenkoseikatsu
jiàn kāng shēng huó
jian4 kang1 sheng1 huo2
jian kang sheng huo
jiankangshenghuo
chien k`ang sheng huo
chienkangshenghuo
chien kang sheng huo
Live Together and Help Each Other共存共栄kyou son kyou ei
kyousonkyouei
kyo son kyo ei
kyosonkyoei
Life of Love愛情生活
爱情生活
aijyou seikatsu
aijyouseikatsu
aijyo seikatsu
aijyoseikatsu
ài qíng shēng huó
ai4 qing2 sheng1 huo2
ai qing sheng huo
aiqingshenghuo
ai ch`ing sheng huo
aichingshenghuo
ai ching sheng huo
Love and Honor愛と譽れ
愛と誉れ
ai to homa re
aitohomare
Love and Respect相愛互敬
相爱互敬
xiāng ài hù jìng
xiang1 ai4 hu4 jing4
xiang ai hu jing
xiangaihujing
hsiang ai hu ching
hsiangaihuching
Principles of Life生活信條
生活信条
shēng huó xìn tiáo
sheng1 huo2 xin4 tiao2
sheng huo xin tiao
shenghuoxintiao
sheng huo hsin t`iao
shenghuohsintiao
sheng huo hsin tiao
Achieve Inner Peace; Find Deep Understanding寧靜而致遠
宁静而致远
níng jìng ér zhì yuǎn
ning2 jing4 er2 zhi4 yuan3
ning jing er zhi yuan
ningjingerzhiyuan
ning ching erh chih yüan
ningchingerhchihyüan
Life with Love愛のある人生ai no a ru jin sei
ainoarujinsei
Mutual Welfare and Benefit自他共榮
自他共荣 / 自他共栄
ji ta kyou ei
jitakyouei
ji ta kyo ei
jitakyoei
Life Full of Love愛に溢れた人生ai ni afu re ta jin sei
ainiafuretajinsei
Life of Love愛に満ちた生活aini michita seikatsu
ainimichitaseikatsu
Even The 100-Foot Bamboo Can Grow One More Foot百尺竿頭更進一步
百尺竿头更进一步
bǎi chǐ gān tóu gèng jìng yī bù
bai3 chi3 gan1 tou2 geng4 jing4 yi1 bu4
bai chi gan tou geng jing yi bu
baichigantougengjingyibu
pai ch`ih kan t`ou keng ching i pu
pai chih kan tou keng ching i pu
Freedom from Anger and Worry Yields Longevity不氣不愁活到白頭
不气不愁活到白头
bù qì bù chóu huó dào bái tóu
bu4 qi4 bu4 chou2 huo2 dao4 bai2 tou2
bu qi bu chou huo dao bai tou
buqibuchouhuodaobaitou
pu ch`i pu ch`ou huo tao pai t`ou
puchipuchouhuotaopaitou
pu chi pu chou huo tao pai tou
You must endure a harsh winter to appreciate the warmth of springtime不經冬寒不知春暖
不经冬寒不知春暖
bù jīng dōng hán bù zhī chūn nuǎn
bu4 jing1 dong1 han2 bu4 zhi1 chun1 nuan3
bu jing dong han bu zhi chun nuan
pu ching tung han pu chih ch`un nuan
pu ching tung han pu chih chun nuan
Impartial and Fair to the Brotherhood and Sisterhood of the World一視同仁
一视同仁
isshidoujin
ishidojin
yí shì tóng rén
yi2 shi4 tong2 ren2
yi shi tong ren
yishitongren
i shih t`ung jen
ishihtungjen
i shih tung jen
Life in Harmony
Balanced Life
和諧生活
和谐生活
hé xié shēng huó
he2 xie2 sheng1 huo2
he xie sheng huo
hexieshenghuo
ho hsieh sheng huo
hohsiehshenghuo
Life in Harmony
Balanced Life
調和生活cho wa sei katsu
chowaseikatsu
Love and Honor深情厚義
深情厚义
shēn qíng hòu yì
shen1 qing2 hou4 yi4
shen qing hou yi
shenqinghouyi
shen ch`ing hou i
shenchinghoui
shen ching hou i
Love and Respect相敬相愛
相亲相爱
xiāng jìng xiāng ài
xiang1 jing4 xiang1 ai4
xiang jing xiang ai
xiangjingxiangai
hsiang ching hsiang ai
hsiangchinghsiangai
Spiritual Strength
Strength of Spirit
精神力量seishin rikiryou
seishinrikiryou
seishin rikiryo
seishinrikiryo
jīng shén lì liàng
jing1 shen2 li4 liang4
jing shen li liang
jingshenliliang
ching shen li liang
chingshenliliang
Confucius: Golden Rule
Ethic of Reciprocity
己所不欲勿施於人
己所不欲勿施于人
jǐ suǒ bú yù wù shī yú rén
ji3 suo3 bu2 yu4, wu4 shi1 yu2 ren2
ji suo bu yu, wu shi yu ren
jisuobuyu,wushiyuren
chi so pu yü, wu shih yü jen
chisopuyü,wushihyüjen
Heaven Blesses the Diligent天道酬勤tiān dào chóu qín
tian1 dao4 chou2 qin2
tian dao chou qin
tiandaochouqin
t`ien tao ch`ou ch`in
tientaochouchin
tien tao chou chin
Inner Peace內心平靜
内心平静
naishin heizyou
naishinheizyou
naishin heizyo
naishinheizyo
nèi xīn píng jìng
nei4 xin1 ping2 jing4
nei xin ping jing
neixinpingjing
nei hsin p`ing ching
neihsinpingching
nei hsin ping ching
True Victory is Victory Over Oneself正勝吾勝
正胜吾胜
masa katsu a gatsu
masakatsuagatsu
Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial大公無私
大公无私
dà gōng wú sī
da4 gong1 wu2 si1
da gong wu si
dagongwusi
ta kung wu ssu
takungwussu
Drinking the water of a well: One should never forget who dug it吃水不忘掘井人chī shuǐ bú wàng jué jǐng rén
chi1 shui3 bu2 wang4 jue2 jing3 ren2
chi shui bu wang jue jing ren
chishuibuwangjuejingren
ch`ih shui pu wang chüeh ching jen
chih shui pu wang chüeh ching jen
A Life of Serenity Yields Understanding淡泊以明志寧靜而致遠
淡泊以明志宁静而致远
dàn bó yǐ míng zhì, níng jìng ér zhì yuǎn
dan4 bo2 yi3 ming2 zhi4, ning2 jing4 er2 zhi4 yuan3
dan bo yi ming zhi, ning jing er zhi yuan
tan po i ming chih, ning ching erh chih yüan
Triple Truth of Japanese Buddhism人間性を再生するのは寛容な心親切な言葉奉仕と思いやりの精神ningensei o saisei suruno wa kanyou na kokoro shinsetsu na kotoba houshi to omoi yari no seishin
ningensei o saisei suruno wa kanyo na kokoro shinsetsu na kotoba hoshi to omoi yari no seishin
ningenseiosaiseisurunowakanyonakokoroshinsetsunakotobahoshitoomoiyarinoseishin
Better to be Happy than Rich安貧樂道
安贫乐道
ān pín lè dào
an1 pin2 le4 dao4
an pin le dao
anpinledao
an p`in le tao
anpinletao
an pin le tao
Keep Your Feet on the Ground腳踏實地
脚踏实地
jiǎo tà shí dì
jiao3 ta4 shi2 di4
jiao ta shi di
jiaotashidi
chiao t`a shih ti
chiaotashihti
chiao ta shih ti
Never Give Up永不放棄
永不放弃
yǒng bù fàng qì
yong3 bu4 fang4 qi4
yong bu fang qi
yongbufangqi
yung pu fang ch`i
yungpufangchi
yung pu fang chi
Inner Strength is Better than Outward Appearance表壯不如里壯
表壮不如里壮
biǎo zhuàng bù rú lǐ zhuàng
biao3 zhuang4 bu4 ru2 li3 zhuang4
biao zhuang bu ru li zhuang
biaozhuangburulizhuang
piao chuang pu ju li chuang
piaochuangpujulichuang
Having High Principles不為五斗米折腰
不为五斗米折腰
bù wèi wǔ dǒu mǐ zhé yāo
bu4 wei4 wu3 dou3 mi3 zhe2 yao1
bu wei wu dou mi zhe yao
buweiwudoumizheyao
pu wei wu tou mi che yao
puweiwutoumicheyao
A Life of Happiness and Prosperity幸福成功的一生xìng fú chéng gōng de yì shēng
xing4 fu2 cheng2 gong1 de yi4 sheng1
xing fu cheng gong de yi sheng
xingfuchenggongdeyisheng
hsing fu ch`eng kung te i sheng
hsingfuchengkungteisheng
hsing fu cheng kung te i sheng
Live for What You Love人生謳歌jin sei ou ka
jinseiouka
jin sei o ka
jinseioka
Patience Yields Peace of Mind能忍自安néng rěn zì ān
neng2 ren3 zi4 an1
neng ren zi an
nengrenzian
neng jen tzu an
nengjentzuan
Inner Strength is Better than Outward Appearance内面の強さは外見の良さに勝るnaimen no tsuyosa ha gaiken no yosa ni masaru
Live In The Moment
Live In The Now
現世
现世
gen sei / genseixiàn shì / xian4 shi4 / xian shi / xianshihsien shih / hsienshih
Live For The Day活在今天huó zài jīn tiān
huo2 zai4 jin1 tian1
huo zai jin tian
huozaijintian
huo tsai chin t`ien
huotsaichintien
huo tsai chin tien
Work Unselfishly for the Common Good克己奉公kè jǐ fèng gōng
ke4 ji3 feng4 gong1
ke ji feng gong
kejifenggong
k`o chi feng kung
kochifengkung
ko chi feng kung
One Justice Can Overpower 100 Evils一正壓百邪
一正压百邪
yī zhèng yā bǎi xié
yi1 zheng4 ya1 bai3 xie2
yi zheng ya bai xie
yizhengyabaixie
i cheng ya pai hsieh
ichengyapaihsieh
Always Striving for Inner Strength自強不息
自强不息
zì qiáng bú xī
zi4 qiang2 bu2 xi1
zi qiang bu xi
ziqiangbuxi
tzu ch`iang pu hsi
tzuchiangpuhsi
tzu chiang pu hsi
The Five Tenets of Confucius仁義禮智信
仁义礼智信
jin gi rei tomo nobu
jingireitomonobu
rén yì lǐ zhì xìn
ren2 yi4 li3 zhi4 xin4
ren yi li zhi xin
renyilizhixin
jen i li chih hsin
jenilichihhsin
A Life of Happiness and Prosperity幸福と繁栄の人生kou fuku to ha nei no jin sei
koufukutohaneinojinsei
ko fuku to ha nei no jin sei
kofukutohaneinojinsei
Live Without Regret生而無悔
生而无悔
shēng ér wú huǐ
sheng1 er2 wu2 hui3
sheng er wu hui
shengerwuhui
sheng erh wu hui
shengerhwuhui
Live Without Regret人生悔い無しjinsei kui nashi
jinseikuinashi
Carpe Diem
Seize the Day
把握今日bǎ wò jīn rì
ba3 wo4 jin1 ri4
ba wo jin ri
bawojinri
pa wo chin jih
pawochinjih
Live For The Day
Seize The Day
今を生きるima wo i ki ru
imawoikiru
Forgive and Forget略跡原情
略迹原情
lüè jì yuán qíng
lve4 ji4 yuan2 qing2
lve ji yuan qing
lvejiyuanqing
chi yüan ch`ing
chiyüanching
chi yüan ching
Strong-Minded Woman烈婦reppu / repu
Good Heart善心yoshinakashàn xīn / shan4 xin1 / shan xin / shanxinshan hsin / shanhsin
Ardent
Fierce
retsuliè / lie4 / lielieh
White Dragon白龍
白龙
bái lóng / bai2 long2 / bai long / bailongpai lung / pailung
Extreme Faithfulness貞烈tei retsu / teiretsu
Good Intentions
Good Will
Good Faith
善意zen i / zenishàn yì / shan4 yi4 / shan yi / shanyishan i / shani
Diligencekinqín / qin2 / qinch`in / chin
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.


Many custom options...


Diligence Scroll
Diligence Scroll
Diligence Scroll
Diligence Scroll


And formats...

Diligence Vertical Portrait
Diligence Horizontal Wall Scroll
Diligence Vertical Portrait
Dictionary

Lookup Virtuous in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary


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All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Virtuous Kanji, Virtuous Characters, Virtuous in Mandarin Chinese, Virtuous Characters, Virtuous in Chinese Writing, Virtuous in Japanese Writing, Virtuous in Asian Writing, Virtuous Ideograms, Chinese Virtuous symbols, Virtuous Hieroglyphics, Virtuous Glyphs, Virtuous in Chinese Letters, Virtuous Hanzi, Virtuous in Japanese Kanji, Virtuous Pictograms, Virtuous in the Chinese Written-Language, or Virtuous in the Japanese Written-Language.

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